Elements of Healing

 

 

  • Try to remember, try not to forget.
  • Good memories (“I remember when…” stories) are important.
  • Time can result in either healing or infection. Visiting and acknowledging your grief promotes healing.
  • You may need support from both inside and outside your family.
  • Faith – Beliefs – Explore them. Lean on them.
  • Learning about the experience of others can give insight into your own story.
  • Assume whatever you are going through is normal.
  • Share the pain of your darkness.
  • Be sensitive to the fact that people grieve differently. Don’t let them tell you how to grieve (or vice versa).
  • Sharing with those who have been there may have a special meaning.
  • Feel free to protest the “why” of death.
  • Take time and space for yourself and work through your guilt over doing so.
  • Take time to laugh and to cry.
  • Take the initiative and make things happen for yourself, work, activity, exercise.
  • Life will never be like it was. You will need to create a new life, make new choices, develop new friendships.
  • Confront guilt by realizing you did the best you could (“All things considered, with no rehearsal for what you went through, you did the best you could”).
  •  You must eventually let go of the pain of losing your loved one.
  • There is nothing wrong with talking to the dead.
  • Persons who have been down the road before you can sometimes by symbols of hope.
  • Your experience of death may be significant in other aspects of your life.

 – Rev. Czillinger